FRIENDS OF ANAHUAC REFUGE

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Check back often to see news about Anahuac NWR other refuges across the country. You can also find more news on our Facebook page.


  • 16 Mar 2015 12:00 PM | Anonymous
    Friends of Anahuac Refuge
    Mini Gator Tales
    March 2015


    Volunteer Workday

    Saturday, March 28, 9am-noon, meet near the VIS


    Volunteers planting trees along Willows Trail

    A volunteer workday is scheduled for Saturday, March 28. Volunteers will be helping doing some landscaping and "spring cleaning" around the Butterfly Garden and VIS. Lunch will be provided to all volunteers. Click here for more details and RSVP information. 


    Nature and Bird Walks in March at Anahuac NWR

    Fridays in March

    10am at Shoveler Pond on the Refuge

    2pm at the Lake Anahuac Boardwalk behind the Visitor Center


    Lake Anahuac boardwalk

    Visit the Refuge on Fridays in March for guided walks at Shoveler Pond and the Lake Anahuac Boardwalk. The Shoveler Pond walk/bird viewing will take place at the Shoveler Pond boardwalk at 10am. The walk along the Lake Anahuac Boardwalk will begin at 2pm from the Visitor Center.

    FOAR Member Appreciation Event

    Saturday, April 18, 2015, 2pm - 8pm


    FOAR will be hosting an appreciation/mixer event on Saturday, April 18, 2015 from 2pm-8pm. It is to show our gratitude for your support and a chance for you to meet other members, the FOAR board, and refuge staff. The event is BYOB, but refreshments will be provided. Visit the event page for more details. Make plans to attend!

    Click here for event details. 


    Spring Newsletter Coming Soon


    Watch for our full Gator Tales newsletter in your inbox or mailbox!

    Check out previous issues here. 


    Spring Rail Walks Scheduled in April


    King/Clapper Rail hybrid at Anahuac NWR, Norman Welsh

    Spring Rail walks at Anahuac NWR are scheduled in April. Participants could see or hear as many as SIX different species of rail during a walk including King, Clapper, Virginia, Yellow, Sora, and the elusive Black Rail. Meet at the VIS at 7am the day of the walk for a briefing to arrange carpools to drive to the walk location on the refuge.

    Check out our Rail Walks page for more details.

    Saturday, April 11 at 7am 

    Saturday, April 25 at 7am  


    National Wildlife Refuge System News

    Campaign to Save Beleaguered Monarch Butterfly


    Monarch butterflies at Anahuac NWR, Joe Blackburn

    The USFWS is addressing the drastically dwindling numbers of monarch butterflies. Their numbers have been cut by 90% in recent years due to loss of habitat across the country. Read how the issue is being addressed at refuges across the country, including Anahuac NWR. Click here for the article.

    Buy a book about the refuge...to support the refuge!


    The 50th anniversary books are for sale at the Visitor Center and the Visitor Information Station as well as online. The book tells the story of the Anahuac NWR's 50th year through photographs and essays from volunteers. Visit the book project page.

    Don't forget to renew your membership!

    Renew online via PayPal or by check in the mail. When renewing, we also encourage you to receive our full quarterly Gator Tales newsletter electronically. It saves trees, saves us printing costs, and gets you access to more content. Click here to join or renew.

  • 14 Mar 2015 12:30 PM | Anonymous
     U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service News

    Campaign to Save Beleaguered Monarch Butterfly


    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service launched a major campaign aimed at saving the declining monarch butterfly.


    The Service signed a cooperative agreement with the National Wildlife Federation (NWF), announced a major new funding initiative with the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF), and pledged $2 million in immediate funding for on-the-ground conservation projects around the country.


    Introducing the new initiatives at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. were Service Director Dan Ashe, U.S. Senator from Minnesota Amy Klobuchar, NWF President and CEO Collin O’Mara, and NFWF representatives.


    Monarchs are found across the United States. While they numbered some 1 billion in 1996, their numbers have declined by approximately 90 percent in recent years. The decline is the result of numerous threats, particularly loss of habitat due to agricultural practices, development and cropland conversion. Degradation of wintering habitat in Mexico and California has also had a negative impact on the species.


    “We can save the monarch butterfly in North America, but only if we act quickly and together,” said Ashe. “And that is why we are excited to be working with the National Wildlife Federation and National Fish and Wildlife Foundation to engage Americans everywhere, from schools and community groups to corporations and governments, in protecting and restoring habitat. Together we can create oases for monarchs in communities across the country.”


    The memorandum of understanding between NWF and the Service will serve as a catalyst for national collaboration on monarch conservation, particularly in planting native milkweed and nectar plants, the primary food sources in breeding and migration habitats for the butterfly.


    The new NFWF Monarch Conservation Fund was kick-started by an injection of $1.2 million from the Service that will be matched by private and public donors. The fund will provide the first dedicated source of funding for projects working to conserve monarchs.


    From California to the Corn Belt, the Service will also fund numerous conservation projects totaling $2 million this year to restore and enhance more than 200,000 acres of habitat for monarchs while also supporting more than 750 schoolyard habitats and pollinator gardens. Many of the projects will focus on the I-35 corridor from Texas to Minnesota, areas that provide important spring and summer breeding habitats in the eastern population’s central flyway.


    The monarch may be the best-known butterfly species in the United States. Every year they undertake one of the world’s most remarkable migrations, traveling thousands of miles over many generations from Mexico, across the United States, to Canada.


    The monarch’s exclusive larval host plant and a critical food source is native milkweed, which has been eradicated or severely degraded in many areas across the U.S. The accelerated conversion of the continent’s native short and tallgrass prairie habitat to crop production has also had an adverse impact on the monarch.


    The monarch serves as an indicator of the health of pollinators across the American landscape. Conserving and connecting habitat for monarchs will benefit other plants, animals and important insect and avian pollinators.


    A new Web site -- http://www.fws.gov/savethemonarch -- provides information on how Americans can get involved with the campaign. 


    Image: Monarch butterflies at Anahuac NWR, photo by Joe Blackburn

    For more stories like this, visit http://www.fws.gov/refuges/friends/newswire/

  • 17 Feb 2015 9:00 AM | Anonymous

     U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service News

    Fostering a New Generation Of Outdoor Enthusiasts


    The newest Conserving the Future implementation team – the Outdoor Recreation Team – is developing a strategy to expand outdoor recreation on national wildlife refuges to fulfill Recommendation 18 (http://1.usa.gov/1yftGMA). The goal is to create a Refuge System recreation program that is relevant and accessible to all Americans in order to create a connected conservation constituency. 


    The team is chaired by Marcia Pradines, chief of the Division of Visitor Services and Communications; Will Meeks, assistant regional director for refuges in the Mountain-Prairie Region; and Charlie Blair, assistant regional director for refuges in the Midwest Region.


    “The Hunting, Fishing and Outdoor Recreation Team did a terrific job writing a strategic plan that will advance hunting and fishing on national wildlife refuges,” said Pradines. “This new team will focus on recreation that is both compatible to the wildlife conservation mission of refuges but also more accessible to ‘nature novices.’ This team is considering how to invite them to enjoy and care about wildlife, and help them become comfortable enjoying the great outdoors.” 


    The Outdoor Recreation Team is assembling four sub-teams, working to prepare draft products as early as July. The sub-teams are: 

    1. Recreation Access: The team will look at improving signs along highways and at other places that inform visitors and also research how transportation affects access. The team will consider how to streamline national guidance on accessibility, and calculate what it will cost in infrastructure investments to provide better access. 
    2. Appropriate Refuge Uses: The team will develop additional appropriate uses guidance to focus on activities that attract new and diverse audiences and encourage partnerships with communities. New guidance would not compromise the standard that all recreation must be compatible with a refuge’s conservation mission. 
    3. Wildlife Observation/Photography: In an era when so many people have great cameras in their smartphones, the team is seeking to establish a photography initiative. The team will expand online resources – and develop training and mentoring opportunities for refuge staff and volunteers – in an effort to provide the Refuge System’s photography offerings to a broader cross-section of the public.  
    4. Other Recreation: Going beyond the “Big Six” – hunting, fishing, wildlife photography, wildlife observation, interpretation and environmental education – the team will, among other tasks, assemble examples of the kind of expansive recreation offered on some wildlife refuges. It also will ensure that at least one outdoor skills center will be launched to help foster a new generation of outdoor enthusiasts. 
    The concept of outdoor skills centers came from the Conserving the Future Hunting, Fishing and Outdoor Recreation team, which last year issued its strategy (http://bit.ly/1vNt8dr). It called on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to undertake steps to increase quality hunting and fishing opportunities. The team also recommended greater collaboration with state agencies in hunting and fishing programs; development of guidance for continuation of fish stocking programs and consideration of new stocking programs; and mentoring of a new generation of outdoor enthusiasts, among other steps.

    The new Outdoor Recreation Team expects complete its work in about two years.

    For more stories like this visit: http://www.fws.gov/refuges/friends/newswire/

  • 17 Feb 2015 7:49 AM | Anonymous
     U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service News

    Obama Administration Moves to Protect Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Recommends Largest Ever Wilderness Designation


    President Obama’s Administration moved to protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska, widely considered one of the most spectacular and remote areas in the world. 


    The Department of the Interior released a Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) and the final environmental impact statement (EIS) for the refuge, which recommends additional protections, and President Obama announced he will make an official recommendation to Congress to designate core areas of the refuge – including its Coastal Plain – as wilderness, the highest level of protection available to public lands. If Congress chooses to act, it would be the largest ever wilderness designation since Congress passed the Wilderness Act more than 50 years ago. 


    “Designating vast areas in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge as Wilderness reflects the significance this landscape holds for America and its wildlife,” said Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell. “Just like Yosemite or the Grand Canyon, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is one of our nation’s crown jewels and we have an obligation to preserve this spectacular place for generations to come.” 


    Based on the best available science and extensive public comment, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s preferred alternative in the CCP recommends 12.28 million acres – including the Coastal Plain – for designation as wilderness. The Service also recommends four rivers – the Atigun, Hulahula, Kongakut, and Marsh Fork Canning – for inclusion into the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. 


    Currently, more than 7 million acres of the refuge are managed as wilderness, consistent with the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980. Only Congress has the authority to designate Wilderness areas and Wild and Scenic Rivers. Recommendations for Wilderness or Wild and Scenic River designations require approval of the Service Director, Secretary of the Interior and the President. 


    The Service is not seeking further public comment on the revised CCP/EIS, but it will be available to the public for review for 30 days, after which, the record of decision will be published. At that point, the President will make the formal wilderness recommendation to Congress. 


    The 19.8 million-acre Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is home to the most diverse wildlife in the arctic, including caribou, polar bears, gray wolves, and muskoxen. More than 200 species of birds, 37 land mammal species, eight marine mammal species and 42 species of fish call the vast refuge home. Lagoons, beaches, saltmarshes, tundra and forests make up the remote and undisturbed wild area that spans five distinct ecological regions. 


    For information about the CCP: http://www.fws.gov/home/arctic-ccp/

    For more stories like this visit: http://www.fws.gov/refuges/friends/newswire/

  • 16 Feb 2015 9:02 AM | Anonymous
    Friends of Anahuac Refuge
    Mini Gator Tales
    February 2015


    Volunteer Workday

    Saturday, February 28, 9am-noon, meet near the VIS


    A volunteer workday has been scheduled for Saturday, February 28. Volunteers will be helping build bird perches to be used in the Rookery at the Skillern Tract and also doing some landscape work in and around the Butterfly Garden. Lunch will be provided to all volunteers. The Butterfly Garden is one of the first places refuge visitors see and home to native plant species on the refuge, so keeping it clean is important! Click here for more event information and to register.

    A second volunteer workday has been scheduled for Saturday, March 28. Another announcement will be sent before the event.

    Audubon Texas / FOAR Monthly Bird Survey

    Saturday, March 7, 9am-noon, meet near the VIS


    Black-bellied Plover photo taken by Colin Shields at Anahuac NWR

    The next monthly bird survey hosted by Audubon Texas and the Friends will take place on Saturday, March 7. Attendees will be helping count birds and record information to be used by refuge staff and Audubon Texas. No experience necessary. Click here for more information and to register.

    Save the Date!

    **FOAR Member Appreciation Event**

    Saturday, March 21, 2015

    FOAR will be hosting a members only event in March. It is a thank you to all of our generous members. More details will be sent out and posted soon on our website. We hope you can make it!
    Support FOAR through AmazonSmile

    When you link to Amazon through our website, FOAR receives a donation from your purchase. Start shopping here! (or click on button on left side of window)


    National Wildlife Refuge System News

    Budget Increased Proposed for USFWS in 2016


    USFWS staff leading environmental education at Anahuac NWR; USFWS

    Big news from the White House this month as the President has proposed a significant budget increase of more than $100 million for the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service in 2016.

    Check out the details here

    Buy a Book About the Refuge...
    to Support the Refuge!
    The 50th anniversary books are for sale at the Visitor Center and Visitor Information Station as well as online on our book project page. The book tells the story of the Anahuac NWR's 50th year through photographs and writing all done by volunteers. Profits from book sales go back to the Friends to pay for refuge projects.
    Don't Forget to Renew Your Membership!
    Don't forget to renew your membership online via PayPal or by check in the mail. When renewing, we also encourage you to receive our full quarterly newsletter, Gator Tales, electronically. It saves trees, saves us printing costs, and gets you access to more content.

  • 06 Feb 2015 5:00 PM | Anonymous
     U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service News

    President Requests $1.6 Billion in Fiscal Year 2016 for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service


    The President’s Fiscal Year 2016 discretionary budget request supports $1.6 billion in programs for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, an increase of $135.7 million over the 2015 enacted level.


    “Investing in the conservation of our wildlife and habitat resources results in myriad health and economic benefits to U.S. communities,” said Service Director Dan Ashe. “Investing in the next American generation is also critical, so we are creating new ways to engage young audiences in outdoor experiences, both on wildlife refuges and partner lands. With 80 percent of the U.S. population currently residing in urban communities, helping urban dwellers to rediscover the outdoors is a priority for the Service.”


    This budget invests in the science-based conservation and restoration of land, water and native species on a landscape scale, considering the impacts of a changing climate; expansion and improvement of recreational opportunities — such as hunting, fishing and wildlife watching — for all Americans, including urban populations; increased efforts to combat illegal wildlife trafficking, which is an international crisis; and the operation and maintenance of public lands.

    America’s Great Outdoors – This initiative, a Service priority, seeks to empower all Americans to share the benefits of the outdoors, and leave a healthy, vibrant outdoor legacy for generations to come. In 2016, a total of $1.5 billion in current funding is proposed for the Service as part of the Administration’s initiative to reconnect Americans to the outdoors while developing a landscape level understanding of a changing climate. This includes $1.3 billion for Service operations, an increase of $119.2 million over the 2015 enacted level.


    A critical component of America’s Great Outdoors is the National Wildlife Refuge System. Funding for the operation and maintenance of the Refuge System is requested at $508.2 million, an increase of $34 million above the 2015 enacted level. Included in that increase is an additional $5 million for the Urban Wildlife Conservation Program, which will extend opportunities to engage more urban youth and adults.


    The budget also requests $108.3 million for grant programs administered by the Service that support America’s Great Outdoors goals. Programs such as the State and Tribal Wildlife Grants are an important source of funds for the conservation and improvement of a range of wildlife and the landscapes on which they depend.


    Land Acquisition – The 2016 Federal Land Acquisition program builds on efforts started in 2011 to strategically invest in the highest priority conservation areas through better coordination among Department of the Interior agencies and the U.S. Forest Service. This budget includes $164.8 million for federal land acquisition, composed of $58.5 million in current funding and $106.3 million in proposed permanent funding. The budget provides an overall increase of $117.2 million above the 2015 enacted level. An emphasis on the use of these funds is to work with willing landowners to secure public access to places to recreate, hunt and fish.


    Cooperative Recovery – Species recovery is another important Service priority addressed in this budget. For 2016, the President requests a total of $10.7 million, an increase of $4.8 million over the enacted level, for cooperative recovery. The focus will be on implementing recovery actions for species nearing delisting or reclassification from endangered to threatened, and actions that are urgently needed for critically endangered species.


    Ecological Services – The budget includes $258.2 million to conserve, protect and enhance listed and at-risk wildlife and their habitats, an increase of $32.3 million compared with the 2015 enacted level. These increases include a $4 million program increase to support conservation of the sagebrush steppe ecosystem, which extends across 11 states in the intermountain West. Conservation of this vast area requires a collaborative effort unprecedented in geographic scope and magnitude. To achieve sustainable conservation success for this ecosystem, the Service has identified priority needs for basic scientific expertise, technical assistance for on-the-ground support, and internal and external coordination, and partnership building with western states, the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies and other partners.


    Additionally, the budget request contains a
    $4 million increase to ensure appropriate design and quick approval of important restoration projects that will be occurring in the Gulf of Mexico region in the near future. The Gulf of Mexico Watershed spans 31 states and is critical to the health and vitality of our nation’s natural and economic resources. The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill dramatically increased the urgency of the Service’s work in the Gulf and our leadership responsibilities. Over the course of the next decade, billions of dollars in settlement funds, Clean Water Act penalties and Natural Resource Damage Assessment restitution will be directed toward projects to study and restore wildlife habitat in the Gulf of Mexico region. The Service is in high demand to provide technical assistance and environmental clearances for these projects, and this funding will ensure that this demand can be met.


    To learn more about the President’s FY 2016 budget request for the Department of the Interior, visit: www.doi.gov/budget.


    Read more information from the National Wildlife Refuge Association.


    Photo courtesy of USFWS

    For more stories like this, visit https://www.fws.gov/refuges/friends/newswire/

  • 20 Nov 2014 12:00 PM | Anonymous

    Friends of Anahuac Refuge
    Mini Gator Tales
    November 2014

    Attention beginner and expert birding enthusiasts!

    Birding Workshop at Anahuac NWR
    Monday, December 15

    Ibis at Anahuac NWR photo by Danni Hill Previte
    A FREE birding workshop is scheduled for 9am on Monday, December 15 at the Anahuac NWR Visitor Center on FM 563. The workshop is presented as a result of an exciting new partnership between Audubon Coastal Texas and the Friends of Anahuac Refuge. The goals of this partnership are to conduct monthly free workshops to train volunteers to identify waterbirds along the upper Texas coast including Anahuac NWR and other good birding locations in this coastal area. The waterbird monitoring project is needed to first establish a baseline of numbers of birds and secondly to use the information to manage waterbird populations by species.


    Outreach Accomplished

    Darlene Prescott and John Kemp at the FOAR booth at Buffalo Bayou Day in Houston
    FOAR completed a sweep of outreach events this fall finishing with Kid's Day at Buffalo Bayou Day and Baytown's Nurture Nature Festival. Thank you to all of the volunteers who helped at our booth! The events allow us to talk to thousands of people about National Wildlife Refuges in the Houston area.



    Inventory and Monitoring along the Gulf Coast
    Check out the first edition of The Gulf Gazette! It is a newsletter from USFWS Inventory & Monitoring biologists working in the Gulf Coast Zone, including Anahuac NWR.

    Topics include:
    -What is the Gulf Coast Zone?
    -Sea-level rise
    -Wintering waterfowl habitat studies
    -Upcoming projects and research
    Click here to check it out!

    Winter Gator Tales Coming Soon!
    Check your mailboxes beginning in December for the winter issue of our full Gator Tales newsletter. Topics include: hunting on the refuge, winter birding, preview of 2015, and more.


    National Wildlife Refuge System News

    Wildfire at McFaddin NWR
    Have you seen smoke coming up from the refuge before? That smoke is likely caused by a wildfire on the refuge. To reduce the risk of wildfires, USFWS firefighters regularly conduct prescribed burns to help restore wildlife habitat. While working on wildfires and prescribed fires, several terms are used.


    Save the Date!
    FOAR Annual Membership Meeting
    Saturday, January 24th, 2015
    Our Annual Membership Meeting will be held on Saturday, January 24th in Anahuac. All members are invited to attend to here about our accomplishments from this year, plans for 2015, and receive Friends volunteer recognition awards.
    More details coming soon...


    Buy a Book About the Refuge...
    to Support the Refuge!


    The 50th anniversary books are for sale at the Visitor Center and Visitor Information Station as well as online on our book project page. The book tells the story of the Anahuac NWR's 50th year through photographs and writing all done by volunteers. Profits from book sales go back to the Friends to pay for refuge projects.
    The perfect gift for the nature lover in your life!


    Don't Forget to Renew Your Membership!
    Don't forget to renew your membership online via PayPal or by check in the mail. When renewing, we also encourage you to receive our full quarterly newsletter, Gator Tales, electronically. It saves trees, saves us printing costs, and gets you access to more content.

  • 18 Nov 2014 12:30 PM | Anonymous

    The Gulf Gazette
    USFWS Inventory & Monitoring-Gulf Coast Zone
    November 2014 Newsletter

    Check out the first edition of The Gulf Gazette! It is a newsletter from USFWS Inventory & Monitoring biologists working in the Gulf Coast Zone, including Anahuac NWR.


    Topics include:

    • What is the Gulf Coast Zone?
    • Sea-level rise
    • Wintering waterfowl habitat studies
    • Upcoming projects and research

  • 18 Nov 2014 9:30 AM | Anonymous

    Attention beginner and expert birding enthusiasts!! 


    A FREE birding workshop is scheduled for December 15, 2014.  The workshop is presented as a result of an exciting new partnership between Audubon Coastal Texas and The Friends of Anahuac Refuge (FOAR).  The goals of this partnership are to conduct monthly free workshops to train volunteers to identify waterbirds along the upper Texas coast including Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) and other good birding locations in this coastal area. The waterbird monitoring project is needed to first establish a baseline of numbers of birds and secondly to use the information to manage waterbird populations by species.

    These workshops will teach volunteers how to collect information by waterbird monitoring at the coastal locations such as Anahuac refuge and other sites. This workshop will be approximately one hour and will be paired with a 1-2 hour field trip which will help volunteers become comfortable with identifying waterbirds and filling out the census form. Beginner and experienced birders are all welcome to participate.

    The first workshop will begin at 9:00 am until approximately 10:00 am December 15, 2014 at the USFWS Chenier Plains NWR Complex Headquarters (ANWR Visitor Center) on FM563 about 2 miles south of I-10 and 4 miles north of Anahuac.  Then there will be a 1-2 hour bird survey in the field ending by 12pmBring your binoculars and favorite field guide, Audubon will bring extras for those who have none. Also, bring a bottle water and a light snack for this event and wear weather appropriate clothing including walking shoes/hiking boots. 

    For additional information contact Travis Lovelace, 409 277-9112 or 409 252-3454 or email at atl3454@windstream.net .

    Ibis photo by Danni Hill Previte

  • 11 Nov 2014 12:00 PM | Anonymous


















    Prescribed Fire and Other Heated Language

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service firefighters regularly reduce wildfire risk and help restore wildlife habitat by conducting prescribed burns at national wildlife refuges. When they do so, they use technical talk that can be confusing. Here’s a primer of some commonly used terms:


    Wildland fire: Any fire burning in a natural area, either a prescribed fire or a wildfire.


    Prescribed fire: A planned wildland fire started and managed by professional firefighters in accordance with an approved prescribed fire burn plan, which specifies allowable conditions for burning and desired results. Also called a prescribed burn. Sometimes called a controlled burn.


    Drip torch: Hand-held steel canister with a spout commonly used by wildland fire specialists to ignite prescribed fires or fight wildfires by dispensing flaming liquid – a mixture of diesel and gasoline – onto burnable vegetation. Related tools include: flame thrower (aka Terra Torch ®), usually mounted on a truck, trailer or off-road vehicle, used to shoot a horizontal stream of gelled gasoline; helitorch, hung from or mounted on a helicopter to disperse ignited lumps of gelled gasoline from the air; and ping pong balls, plastic balls filled with flammable chemicals that are dropped from a helicopter and ignite after hitting the ground.


    Fuels: Live or dead vegetation – such as grass, overgrown brush, trees or logging slash – that could fuel a wildfire. Also called hazardous fuels when referring to conditions creating high risk of wildfire.


    Fuels management: The practice of reducing wildfire risk through planned and approved actions to thin or remove vegetation that could fuel a wildfire. Fuels treatments can also improve wildlife habitat and commonly are done on a rotating schedule using prescribed fire, mechanical removal with chainsaws or heavy equipment, and chemical treatment with herbicides. Also called hazardous fuels reduction when referring to conditions creating high risk of wildfire.


    Control line: An inclusive term for constructed or natural barriers used to stop the spread of a wildland fire. The part scraped or dug to mineral soil is called a fireline.


    Spot fire: A new fire start ignited outside of control lines by blowing or falling embers from the main fire. Wildland firefighters must routinely monitor for spot fires, which can occur miles away, depending on weather conditions.


    Smoke management: Decisions and actions taken by wildland firefighters, land managers and air quality regulators, especially during prescribed fire, to minimize or divert smoke from settling into populated or high-traffic areas. This prevents health and safety hazards, such as poor air quality or impaired visibility. Managing smoke is more difficult during wildfires. It sometimes involves scientific monitoring of particulate levels and public notice of air quality.


    Cohesive Strategy:  An initiative of the Departments of the Interior and Agriculture in which governmental and non-governmental organizations collaborate to manage wildland fire by responding to individual wildfires, supporting fire-adapted communities, and restoring and maintaining fire-resilient lands. It is officially known as the National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy.


    Photo: USFWS Fire Crew working on wildfire on McFaddin NWR, 2013


    For more stories like this visit: http://www.fws.gov/refuges/friends/newswire/



The Friends of Anahuac Refuge was established in 1997 as a 501(c)3 non-profit organization based in Anahuac, TX.

For questions, call the refuge office at 409-267-3337.

Email: FriendsofAnahuacRefuge@gmail.com


Mailing Address:

P.O. Box 1348

Anahuac, TX 77514

Refuge Office Address:

4017 FM 563, Anahuac, TX 77514

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